Itraconazole

Itraconazole

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This medication requires a prescription from your doctor.

1% or 40mg/5mL solution
for atomization, nasal rinse, or nasal spray

Itraconazole is an antifungal commonly used to eliminate fungi and mycotoxins associated with biotoxin illness. Atomized intranasal EDTA is used first to dissolve the biofilm coating, which clears the way for a direct attack by the itraconazole. Once the biofilm is detroyed, a nasal spray, sinus rinse, or atomized solution of this medication is used to eliminate nasal colonized fungi and mycotoxins. This medication is sometimes included with bactroban (mupirocin), EDTA, and gentamicin, which together is referred to as BEG-I nasal spray.

Itraconazole Delivery Options

Nasal Spray Treatment – This method uses a nasal spray pump to deliver liquid medication to the sinus area.

Medicated Sinus Rinse Therapy – This method flushes the nasal cavities with a medicated saline solution. The medication and saline solution are mixed in a nasal rinse bottle, which is used to irrigate the nasal passages and sinuses.

Atomized Treatment – This method uses an atomizer to pump in liquid medication to the sinus area with an easy-to-use motorized device. The compact electronic atomizer releases the liquid medication into a mist that gets inhaled into the nasal passages and sinus cavities.

What is Itraconazole?

Itraconazole is an azole antifungal in the same class as voriconazole and fluconazole. These antifungals work by blocking the synthesis of an essential chemical that makes up the fungal cell membrane. They can be used both orally and topically, although for treating fungal colonization in the nasal passages a topical spray is more frequently used.

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